Everyday Ways to Teach Kids About Sexual Consent

Everyday Ways to Teach Kids About Sexual Consent

“It’s never too early or too late to help kids develop the capacity for healthy relationships. With multiple sexual assaults in the news over the last 6 months, teaching our kids about sexual consent seems more relevant than ever as a key skill in the healthy relationship toolbox. As parents, it can feel scary to bring up loaded issues like sexual consent and many of us don’t have a clue where to start. Luckily, the following article can help to lower our anxiety. We empower our children through routine, everyday actions in which we model for children regard for their bodies, boundaries and emotions. As our children experience our respect for them in everyday ways, they are more likely to regard their own and other people’s bodies with respect and integrity as well.” Nicole Hayford, Parent Sexual Assault Response Coordinator, Naval Base Kitsap Counselor, Bainbridge Youth Services 5 Everyday Ways to Teach Your Kids about Consent by Lisa McCrohan Sexual consent can be tough to explain to young kids. But this psychotherapist has some advice. My daughter and I are waiting in the exam room for the pediatrician. We are here for her annual wellness checkup. And from the moment our pediatrician walks through the door, she is all about focusing on my daughter. She looks my daughter in the eyes and kindly greets her. She shakes her hand. She addresses my daughter with her questions. She explains READ WHOLE...

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An Emotional Intelligence Toolbox

An Emotional Intelligence Toolbox

“Putting ‘tools’ in my children’s ‘toolbox’ to equip them with the skills and resources they need to navigate their own life has been a parenting goal since my daughters entered school. In retrospect, most of the tools I have focused on have been soft skills or people skills, which are defined as Emotional Intelligence (EQ). Since EQ has been introduced, taught, and studied, research has shown that success is far more dependent on one’s EQ than one’s IQ. This article by Bainbridge’s own, Marilyn Price-Mitchell, both defines EQ and gives parents and educators concrete examples (the best kind!) to help children fill their toolbox.” Julie Davis, Youth Group Leader, Grace Episcopal Church Emotional Intelligence: A Toolbox for Success By Marilyn Price-Mitchell, PhD Are you raising emotionally intelligent children? Is your child’s teacher building a culture of social and emotional intelligence in the classroom? What methods are working? Emotional intelligence has become a popular term since Daniel Goleman authored his book with the same title in 1995. Several decades of research not only confirms the importance of teaching kids to understand and manage their emotions, but also suggests that emotional intelligence is predictive of READ ENTIRE ARTICLE   Join the Island Conversation: How do you plan to integrate these ideas into your teaching and/or parenting? In what ways do you already fill your students’ or child’s EQ...

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10 Parenting Habits that Foster Healthy Relationships

10 Parenting Habits that Foster Healthy Relationships

Teams succeed and fail according to the sociability, as well as the playing ability, of their members.  Great teams are families whose players trust each other, give frank feedback to each other, accept that feedback and work together to achieve common goals.  In the process, they laugh and cry and they recover and succeed together.  Team members who are not integrated may take either too much responsibility or not enough responsibility for outcomes of the group. Having played for successful teams and having experienced the joy and satisfaction of common success, I always strive to recreate that experience as a coach.  We discuss leadership.  We look for leadership traits in each other when choosing captains.  We understand that no one can succeed alone.  We integrate newcomers.  We study success and failure while looking for ways to improve. Ballan Campeau, Bainbridge Soccer Coach  Sociability: How Families Learn Together with Love and Respect By Marilyn Price-Mitchell, PhD Each of us wants our children to develop positive relationships—to experience the power of unconditional love, support, friendship, and encouragement throughout school and life. But we also know that creating and sustaining relationships is hard work—effort that requires a cooperative ability to interact with others. Psychologists call this capacity sociability, and we recognize it in children when we observe their enjoyment of being together—chatting, joking, laughing, working, and creating friendships. Sociability often gets confused with being an introvert or extrovert. But if we think of sociability as a higher level concept than introversion or extroversion, this attribute is easier to grasp. Read Entire...

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